I've knit four pair of socks (pics: one | two | three | four) with Patons Kroy before, and I really like that the yarn is slightly thicker than the usual sock yarn I get. It makes thick cushy socks that still don't feel like they take up too much space in my shoes. As with all the other Kroy socks I've made, I started this new pair on US 2 (2.75mm) needles and... it was way too loose. Floppy fabric doesn't make good socks at all!

The beginning of a toe-up sock.

What? What is going on! A little internet research affirmed my suspicion that the ragg shades really are a little thinner, more like a standard sock yarn. (Hrmph.) So I ripped out the start of the toe that I had, and began again on US 1 (2.25mm) needles, this time with a navy yarn for the toe. That feels like a much better fabric, for sure, and I like the contrasting colour in the toe better too.

A half-knit toe-up sock with a navy toe and rainbow stripes.

The sock starts with a figure eight cast-on with fourteen loops, and I increased on every other round until I had 64 stitches total. It's now about two inches shorter than my foot, so at this point I'll put in waste yarn across half the stitches and then go on knitting the leg of the sock. Later, I'll pull out the waste yarn and pick up those live stitches to knit an afterthought heel. (Or is it a "forethought" heel, since I'm planning exactly where it will be?)

This blogpost has some interesting details about the construction of afterthought heels, as well as some hints about improving the fit. Since there's no gusset in this kind of sock, it can sometimes be a little too tight over the ankle. I'm going to try the short-row suggestion and see how well it works for my own foot.

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2 Responses to “In Which the Pirate Gets Stripy.”
  1. Angela says:

    I admire folks who make toe-up socks with regularity. Those toe-up cast-ons are a royal PITA and so fiddly; I just don't have the patience to deal with them. A moral failing, that. Maybe someday I'll work a bunch of them in a row to get past the awkwardness.

    I love how that ragg yarn makes such regular stripes!

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