Archive for the “tour de fleece 2018” Category

It's a month from the end of the Tour de Fleece, and my combospin is all spun, plied, overplied, cable-plied, skeined, soaked, thwacked, and dried!

The singles were quite fine, because I knew the eventual yarn was going to be made up of four strands. I wasn't sure how to determine the final WPI from the singles, as the strands kind of lock together in the plying process, so I aimed for the 42 WPI line on my control card.

Three bobbins of fine singles with a penny for scale resting on a bit of blue and brown fibre.

Sometimes I just had to stop to admire the way the silk strands gleamed in the sunlight.

Blue and brown wool-silk blend. The silk is very shiny.

The next step was plying. I made two-ply yarns that were half Falkland and half Merino/silk, and then ran them through the wheel again to double the original amount of twist. The top strand (shown across the back of my hand) is extra twisty. If I had been making a two-ply yarn, I would have left it at just the amount of plying twist shown in the bottom strand of yarn.

Two strands of yarn over the back of a hand. One of the strands is much more tightly plied than the other.

Then I plied the two two-plies with each other in the direction I'd originally spun the singles, taking out some of that extra twist and creating a very round, but slightly bumpy, cabled yarn. When I skeined it off it was still quite twisty, but a warm soak and several very firm thwacks against the inside of the bathtub evened it out and let it lie straight. That was a relief.

Three skeins of blueish-brownish yarn on a wooden table.

In the closeup view you can see the texture and the way the two strands interlock to form one. Instead of all four strands rotating around, as you'd see with a traditional four-ply yarn, this almost looks like links in a chain.

Closeup of cabled yarn with a penny for scale. It is a little thicker than sock yarn and has a bumpy texture.

In total, I got 364 yards of yarn that's just thicker than standard sock yarn, from eight ounces of fibre. Not too bad at all! Now I need to finish up some of the socks on my needles so I can justify starting a new project with this yarn. I don't know if it will be smooth enough for socks, but I'll swatch and find out.

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Last weekend, in the middle of the Tour de France, I taught a new spinner to make fluff into yarn... and then I sold Patience, the Ashford Traditional, to her. I'm a little wistful, but mostly happy - the poor wheel had been little more than decoration for a while, and it's good to know that she's gone to a new home where she can be useful again.

Of course, I used some of the proceeds to buy new fibre.

I've been thinking that my next spinning project should be a sweater quantity. So first I looked at the "for sale or trade" section on Ravelry, and then I looked at Etsy, and then I looked at a bunch handspun sweater projects. One in particular caught my eye, and led me to buy a sampler pack of Hipstrings' "Buoy Blend". I picked six colours that I thought would go well together, and am expecting the delivery early next week.

Then I thought that it might be fun to try out a variety of wools from different breeds of sheep, and ended up at World of Wool (which is having a sale right now). I got some Southdown and some Dorset, both of which I've heard are great for socks. I got a sampler pack of Shetland wool in four natural colours. And... I designed a custom blend for myself for the sweater-spin. It's 25% merino, 25% BFL, and 50% Corriedale - I'm hoping to get the right mix of softness from the merino and BFL, and sturdiness from the Corriedale. These are the colours I chose, after much deliberating:

Eight colours of wool: navy, lime green, aqua, dusty teal, light blue, off-white, raspberry pink, and grass green.

It will be a while before that shipment arrives, of course, because it's a custom blend and it's shipping from the UK. That will give me time to finish up my spins-in-progress.

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It's that time again! Time for the Tour de France Fleece! For the second year, I've joined Team Combospin - but this year I'm going for something far less ambitious, and picked out an eight-ounce project. I have four ounces each of Falkland and a Merino/silk blend, both from Bullen's Wullens, in similar colourways. The first step was to open up the fibre and see how the colours were arranged. It looks as if there's more brown than blue in both fibres. The Merino/silk has shiny blue silk strands shooting through the brown sections, but the Falkland's colours are more distinctly separated. (Click the picture to embiggen it and see!)

Two pieces of brown and blue fibre folded into S-shapes on a wood tabletop

The second step was to decide how (or if) I wanted to split the fibre up. My plan is to spin a cabled yarn by first making two-plies with one strand of each fibre, and then plying those into a single four-ply yarn. Given how much that will blend the colours together, I decided to just simply break each fibre in half and spin it end to end. In theory, this should provide a subtly striped finished yarn.

By completely randomized selection whim I began with the Falkland, and finished the first half of singles on Saturday afternoon. Here it is with the other, unspun, half:

A bobbin of fine singles with a penny for scale rests on a nest of unspun wool.

The Falkland wool is very pleasant to spin! It's nicely crisp and crimpy, with almost no neps. It drafts smoothly and evenly, and doesn't have any matted sections or parts that just slip apart. I paused frequently to measure against my control card (read more about how to measure handspun yarn on Knitty if you're interested). The finest line on my card is 40, and that seemed like a good thickness for the singles. The finished yarn will probably come out to be a heavy fingering to sport weight after it's washed, but I've never made a cabled yarn before and I'm not sure of the ratio to figure out final WPI from the thickness of the singles. It will be an interesting experiment!

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