Archive for the “crossing trails hat” Category

Over the weekend I sewed the lining into the hat (which wasn't nearly as tricky as I was expecting). I used the instructions on Techknitter's blog post, which also explains why one would want to sew a facing down rather than knit it in. The only difference is that I didn't split the stitch I was sewing onto, because I want the stitches and floats to be able to move and shift around when the hat is blocked.

A stranded colourwork hat is inside out, with a facing partially sewn in. A darning needle is halfway into the next stitch to be tacked down.

And then, yeah, I took out the top of the hat and re-knit it. There were some really loose stitches that I couldn't tighten up well enough, I wasn't 100% happy with one of the decreases being white instead of black, and I wanted a smoother decrease overall. It was worth the time it took to do, and I'm glad I didn't spend a lot of time waffling over whether I should or shouldn't.

The hat took a nice warm bath in some Eucalan right now, and I'm excited to see what it looks like once it's blocked and dry! (Also: the soap dispenser in my bathroom is one my dad made. He's getting really good at this pottery thing. I haven't asked him, but I bet he'd be happy to take orders for yarn bowls...)

A stranded colourwork hat floats in a bathroom sink full of water topped with bubbles.

Edited to add: it's drying now! Is it impolite of me to say that I think it looks amazing?

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In an effort to get this hat finished while it's still cold enough to wear it this year, I finished knitting it earlier this week... and then spent far too long angling the camera, myself, and the bathroom mirror to get a good picture of it. It's still unblocked here; the lining isn't sewn down yet, and I've left the lifeline in for insurance, because I'm not 100% sure that the way I worked the decreases will block out smoothly.

This weekend I plan to do all the finishing work and get some good photos, and then I can write up the pattern for publication! I'm pretty excited about releasing my first pattern of 2018, and hopefully I'll have the time to design and knit and write some more before the year is out. I'd like to get back to my purple cabled socks next. After that, who knows?

There's also been some progress on the second of my green Cakewalk socks - it's about halfway through the leg now. I've been knitting while watching YouTube videos (watercolour tutorials, interestingly enough) because I can't knit and watch TV or movies very well. At least, not if I want to keep track of the plot, characters, and dialogue!

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Yesterday I had a surprise day off work due to high winds. It was such a strange storm - we didn't really get any rain, only winds. The airport a few miles away reported wind gusts of almost 70 miles an hour! Trees came down around the area, lots of people lost power, bridges were closed, and they're just now starting to get everything put back together again. But hey, a day off means a day to knit! And what better project to work on than my new hat design?

There I was, happily knitting away, when it occurred to me that the hat was looking awfully... well... tall. There are a lot of rounds left in my chart, and my head's not that big. Hm, I thought to myself, it's the same number of rounds as that other hat I made, and that one fits all right. So I kept going. But it kept nibbling at the edge of my thoughts. Isn't this hat kind of tall? I'm nowhere near the decrease rounds yet. Am I sure about this?

black and white hat in progress, about 2/3 done

I went downstairs and retrieved last year's hat, which fits me snugly and is exactly the right height, and set it down next to the new hat. Suddenly the mistake was crystal-clear:

black and white hat WIP next to finished colourwork hat

I had knit fifteen rounds of corrugated ribbing instead of ten. The chart says ten (I triple-checked) so I don't know why those five extra rounds are in there, but there they are. I could see three options:

One, ignore the problem and keep knitting. But then I'd have a too-tall hat, wouldn't I, and what good is a too-tall hat? It wouldn't be sufficiently too tall to become a slouchy hat, it would just be a sticky-up hat. No good.

Two, rip back to the tenth round of ribbing and begin again. But then I'd lose a lot of work, and a lot of time, and I'd be annoyed.

Three, rework the chart so the decreases at the top of the hat begin a little earlier. That seemed like the most wise decision to make, so that's what I've done, and I think it will be all right.

I still have a doubt or two about the hat's circumference, but I'm sure I'm not fully accounting for the power of a good strong wet blocking. With only 20-something rounds to go, I should be finding that out pretty soon!

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While the commitment trying to start and finish a project during the Olympics is more than I want to take on right now, *starting* seemed easy enough. (Starting is always the easy part, isn't it.) And so, while I watched the Opening Ceremonies, I cast on for a new colourwork hat, with the same Cascade 220 that I used for Michael's bicolour hat.

My original plan had been to use a two-colour cast on, knit some corrugated ribbing, then pick up stitches from the cast on edge and knit a facing in a slightly thinner yarn, the leftover sportweight lambswool from my old Highwayman Armwarmers. That didn't quite work out the way I'd hoped, but before I ripped it all out to start over, I took this video of the way I work the corrugated ribbing:

I hold both strands of yarn in my left hand, the darker one over my index finger and the lighter over my middle finger. The working yarns are wrapped twice around my pinky to maintain tension, which is why they look as if they're twisted together. Normally when I'm knitting with just one strand, it's only wrapped once, but with two (or more) strands they pull against each other and get a little loose.

Anyway, I didn't like the way the cast-on edge looked after I'd picked up the stitches, so I scrapped it and started over with a new technique. Instead of starting with the hat and working the facing afterwards, I started with the facing. I cast on the same number of stitches as I'd planned for the hat, using the thinner yarn but on the same size needles as I'll use for the hat, and I knit until my leftovers were almost gone, saving some for sewing the facing down later. (There's actually another full ball of the stuff in my stash, but I didn't want to dip into that. I can use it for other hats!)

With 3.25" (just over 8cm) of facing knit, I switched to the Cascade 220 and knit one round in each shade of gray, then purled one round for a turning ridge, and then got started on the body of the hat with the corrugated ribbing.

While it looks as though that purl round is sticking out unattractively right now, it will create a spot in the knitting that just wants to fold inwards (because inside, it's a recessed round of knit stitches amongst a sea of purls) and will create a nice firm edge at what will be the bottom of this hat, once the facing is folded up and sewn down.

If all goes according to plan (I estimated the gauge based on Michael's hat, and I know how big my own head is, and I'm pretty sure this will fit... I hope...) I'll have a double-warm hat with a triple-warm band around my ears. And if it comes out too big, then someone else will have a double-warm hat with a triple-warm brim. But I think it will work. Fingers crossed.

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