Archive for the “sock” Category

Mom told me that she'd been teaching her granddaughters (my niecelings) to knit, that all three of them had caught on, and that I should bring a project to her house so that we could all knit together. As I mentioned in my previous post, I didn't have anything that was in a good spot to be a traveling project. But instead of saying no, I cast on for a new sock. This is Trekking XXL in colourway 66, which was a gift from Janis to me a Very Long Time ago. Before I started the blog. Before Ravelry even existed. (It was a birthday present. In 2007.) I feel badly that I haven't knit it up before now, but now I am! I decided to go with my own Sibling Socks pattern, as the other pair I have is super-comfy.

The first few rounds of a purplish sock cuff, with the ball of yarn at the top of the picture.

Even though I have several other projects on the needles right now, I'm really glad I started this sock so I could bring it along, because otherwise we wouldn't have gotten this picture of all six of us knitting (well, my SIL is crocheting, but that still counts) together. How fantastic is this?

Also, I should point out, my dad *made* all those yarn bowls. I'm trying to convince him to open an online shop for his work. Aren't they lovely?

Three adults and three children knitting and crocheting on a couch.

Having a new traveling sock gave me something to do at the car dealership while I was waiting for my annual inspection, too. I've made a little bit of progress and now the oil-slick colours are really starting to show up nicely. It's slow-ish going with 80 stitches on size 0 (2mm) needles, but I enjoy the feel of the yarn and I know I'll be glad to have the finer-gauge socks in my drawer when it starts getting cooler out but is still too warm for the thicker ones.

A few inches of sock leg in oilslick colors, in the waiting room of a car dealership.

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These two socks have been stuck at the heels for a few weeks already, and they were holding me up. I like to turn heels when I'm by myself and can keep track of where I am in the process, or inevitably something goes wrong and I have to rip back. I decided that I'd just buckle down and get them both back to the point where I can work on them and hold a conversation at the same time.

The second of the handspun knee socks had some adjustments from the first one so that it will fit better. Fortunately, I'd left comprehensive notes for myself so that I'd know what to do. On this sock, the third wedge of the Sweet Tomato Heel ends with 16 stitches unworked in the centre, rather than eight, and I can tell that this will be a better fit already. I finished the heel and the inch or so of stockinette that comes after it, and got started on the ribbing for the leg. It will be another six inches of knitting before I have to think about increasing for the calf.

These are way too tall for my sock blockers and the ribbing on the leg really makes them look funny when they're lying flat on the table! Once the second sock is finished, I'll get proper photos of them on my feet/legs to show off the heel and leg shaping.

One and a half knee socks in burgundy stripes, and half a ball of yarn.

I also made it past the heel and gusset decreases on the first of my Twisted Stitch Trilogy socks, which is still unnamed, so I've just been calling it Twisted ONE. This will be my next published sock pattern! I'm really happy with everything about them - the yarn, the colour, the texture, the feel and fit. I'll cast on for Twisted TWO with the yarn I bought at Mom's LYS just as soon as this pair is off the needles!

One and a half amber socks, and half a ball of sock yarn, displayed on blue sock blockers.

Right now the handknits are sharing space in a dresser drawer with the storebought socks, but they're all starting to feel a little squished in there. Not that I have a sock addiction problem or anything, but... pretty soon I'm going to need to give the handknits their own drawer.

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I'm working on a new sock design!

Blue-painted toenails peek out of a partially knitted amber sock.

This is "Tess' Designer Yarns Super Socks & Baby" in a tonal amber that I bought at MDSW some years ago, and am pleased to finally be knitting with. I like how it's working up; the stitch definition is good for this mini-cable pattern, and the yarn is soft and feels good running through my fingers.

(No, the patterning doesn't go all the way to the toes. That's just how far I'd gotten on the leg portion of the sock when I stopped to take the picture.)

I'd love to find a mannequin foot that's just my size, to better display and photograph the pattern samples. Unfortunately, all the womens' mannequin feet are shorter than mine, and all the mens' mannequin feet are wider. I'm sure a custom foot would be unthinkably expensive... so now I'm wondering how difficult it would be to make one. I could make a mold of my foot with duct tape, fill it with expanding foam for stability, and wrap it in pretty fabric - but it might be difficult to slide a sock on over that. And plain duct tape would be pretty ugly. Any ideas?

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Once I got past the heel of the handspun sock, I realized that with my inconsistent gauge (because the yarn isn't entirely consistent) it might not be a bad idea to work the leg in ribbing. I decided on a 4x2 rib and worked my way up. When I reached my usual stopping point for socks, there was still a lot of yarn left in the ball - which is just half of the total yarn I spun up - and so I decided to make these knee socks! They're so thick and cushy, I'll only be able to wear them in the winter anyway... so why not keep my whole calf warm?

But knee socks require increases to fit around one's calf. I measured the sock, my leg, the gauge I was getting, and then I looked at examples of ribbing increases to see different ways it could be done. The center of the back of the sock was on one of the purl gutters, so I increased in the gutter, one new purl stitch every other round. When I had four purls in a row, I changed to adding one new knit stitch every other round. Before long, I had a whole new rib.

Four rounds later, I did it again but the other way - since the center of the back was now a knit column, rather than a purl gutter, I started adding knit stitches first. When I had eight in a row, I added the new purl gutter in the middle of them.

A ribbed sock stretched over a hand, showing increases in the ribbing.

I think one more rib will be just right to fit my calf, but I'll keep trying it on as I go to make sure! After that I'll just need to figure out if I want to change to 2x2 ribbing for the cuff or do something else. Decisions, decisions...

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Woohoo! Finished socks!

A pair of rainbow striped socks, with dark blue cuffs, toes, and heels.

These socks were knit toe-up with Kroy Socks in the "Blue Striped Ragg" colourway, and the contrast cuffs/heels/toes are knit in Premier Serenity in navy blue. I... was kind of displeased with both yarns, actually. The Kroy was all right, but every other colourway of Kroy socks I've knit has been thick and squishy on US 2 (3 mm) needles, and this was just thinner than a standard sock yarn. It was fine, just not what I was looking for. The Serenity, on the other hand, was thin and slippery and splitty and I don't like it at all. Hrmph.

That said, I'm pretty pleased with the finished socks. I had to do some duplicate stitch reinforcing around the corners of the heels, but the extra short rows in these heels make them fit better than the other afterthought heels I've done before. And I *love* the stripes! I do wish I'd thought of knitting the first round of the cuff to prevent those little purl blips, but they're kinda cute so I guess it's okay.

So... what's next? I'm still working on the handspun sock, but that's not great at traveling because the yarn-cake collapses when I put it in my bag. I need a sock that I can carry around with me, and a pattern that's interesting, memorizable, and doesn't take too much concentration to knit. Maybe I'll pull out the stitch dictionaries and put something together!

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As I made progress on the handspun sock, I started to think (as you do) about heels. What kind of heel would I use? Would it be deep enough? A typical short-row heel would definitely not fit, unless I did some increases first. So I did some research and decided to try the Banded Expanded Heel technique, which is a modification of Cat Bordhi's Sweet Tomato Heel. I measured my foot, checked my gauge, did some maths, and knit the heel...

No. (I didn't even take any pictures.) It's not that the heel was poorly designed; it's actually great. It's that my calculations were off in pretty much every way. I'd started too late, so the foot of the sock was too big. And I'd increased to too many stitches, so it was also baggy. I ripped back to just after my initial increases and did some more research.

Eventually I decided to try the straight-up Sweet Tomato Heel without modifications. I don't have the book with all the sock patterns, but Cat was kind enough to upload a detailed tutorial video for just the heel itself, which I was able to follow well enough to knit the heel without wondering if I was doing it right. (I was.)

It's difficult to try on a sock at this point but I did wriggle it onto my foot, and it seems to fit just right. It's *impossible* to take a photo of a half-knit sock with DPNs sticking out everywhere while it's on your own foot, so I slid it onto one of the blockers for a photo op.

A half-knit toe-up sock on a blocker, with half a ball of yarn next to it.

So far I like the Sweet Tomato Heel *way* better than the standard short-row sock heel, and I definitely want to use it in more socks! I'm going to have to try it with regular sock yarn to see if it still needs the pre-heel increases, at least. One thing I *really* like about the Sweet Tomato Heel is that I'd feel comfortable just knitting it from memory, which is a lot of points in its favour for whatever sock-in-progress is traveling around with me.

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It's taken a concentrated effort, but over the weekend I finally finished the combospin that I started for last year's Tour de France. It's all spun up, plied, and skeined off - The Woolee Winder on the Sonata makes plying so much faster and easier! I ended up with roughly 700 yards of three-ply yarn from two pounds of a variety of fibre. I'm sure it will poof up and lose some yardage once it's washed, which I'll do later today.

Several multi-coloured skeins of handspun yarn

Now the question is, what to do with it? My original plan was to spin for a sweater, but I don't think I have enough yardage to make that work. Probably I should have gone for a two-ply rather than three, if I wanted sweater yardage. And, if I'm being honest, I'm not 100% thrilled with the overall colour. I put the yellow in for a pop, thinking it would be too dull without it... but it's too much contrast, too much of a barber-pole effect.

Maybe I'll like it better once it's knit up? I'm considering making some treadle covers for the spinning wheels. I often spin barefoot, and wouldn't that be nice and soft and squishy!

Meanwhile, I started knitting toe-up socks from a different handspun yarn, this chain-plied merino that I spun a few years ago. First I tried knitting on US 2 (2.75mm) needles, which gave me a fabric that was slightly too loose. Then I switched to US 1 (2.25 mm), and I'm getting a very firm and stiff sock... but that's okay, these will be hiking/boot socks. And since the yarn isn't superwash, I expect it to get softer and stretchier with wear and time.

The beginning of a toe-up sock using handspun yarn, with random stripes of burgundies and blues

Because they're so firm, though, I'm trying a new kind of heel. I started working increases about an inch and a half before where the heel should start to make a small gusset, and then more increases will get worked into the short-row heel wedges. This should be interesting at the very least, and if it doesn't fit right... well, maybe this yarn wasn't meant to be socks after all. I have 500 yards or so of it, so there are lots of possibilities.

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Last weekend I went to Maryland Sheep and Wool with my mom! It was a really fun day and I'm glad we made it work out so we could go together. She got a skein of sock yarn in a rich brown, and I got two ounces of this tussah sliver from Little Barn. My plan is to spin it fairly fine and then use it as a lining for my next pair of Fleeps to make them warmer and more wind-blocking.

Tussah silk fiber in teal blue, gray, and a little gold

There were so many pretty yarns and fibres there, as usual, and I was tempted to buy some things that I eventually decided to put back. We took quite some time digging through one of the bargain bins and found a bag of sock yarn we liked, but... it was nine 50g balls. That's 4.5 pair of identical socks? Mehhh. I don't want two pair of socks from the same yarn, even if it's nice colours.

I also ooh'd and ahh'd over several braids of fibre, but... I have enough as it is. The merino/silk Ashland Bay was tempting as usual, but I think I can get a better price for it online - and if I'm going to do that, I'd better do it soon, as it's been discontinued (sniffle, wah) and won't be available for much longer. (So now, of course, I'm looking at dyed top on Etsy, as if refraining from buying things I don't need at MDSW gives me license to buy things I don't need once I get home again?)

Meanwhile, I've finished the majority of the rainbow striped socks! Here they are, with the ends woven in, and the waste yarn indicating where the heel will be knit in. I'm using the instructions from this blog post at Knit Better Socks, and trying the trick of a few short rows to get a little more room in the heel.

Two rainbow-striped socks, with scrap yarn where the heel will be added

Here I've tried on the sock with a partially knit heel to make sure that it's in the right place (it is) and you can see the little half-moon of short rows in the corner. The solid dark blue yarn is Serenity Sock and honestly I'm not quite happy with it; it's a little thin and a little splitty. Ah well - if the heel wears through, I can pick it out and add another! That's a definite plus to the afterthought heel method.

A partially-knit heel on a stripy sock, modeled on a foot

Michael indicated an interest in seeing the process of getting from waste yarn to actual heel, so I'll be saving the second sock to finish the next time he's visiting. He's up to the heel flap of his own second sock, and I'm curious whether he'll want to start another pair after he finishes his first.

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I've knit four pair of socks (pics: one | two | three | four) with Patons Kroy before, and I really like that the yarn is slightly thicker than the usual sock yarn I get. It makes thick cushy socks that still don't feel like they take up too much space in my shoes. As with all the other Kroy socks I've made, I started this new pair on US 2 (2.75mm) needles and... it was way too loose. Floppy fabric doesn't make good socks at all!

The beginning of a toe-up sock.

What? What is going on! A little internet research affirmed my suspicion that the ragg shades really are a little thinner, more like a standard sock yarn. (Hrmph.) So I ripped out the start of the toe that I had, and began again on US 1 (2.25mm) needles, this time with a navy yarn for the toe. That feels like a much better fabric, for sure, and I like the contrasting colour in the toe better too.

A half-knit toe-up sock with a navy toe and rainbow stripes.

The sock starts with a figure eight cast-on with fourteen loops, and I increased on every other round until I had 64 stitches total. It's now about two inches shorter than my foot, so at this point I'll put in waste yarn across half the stitches and then go on knitting the leg of the sock. Later, I'll pull out the waste yarn and pick up those live stitches to knit an afterthought heel. (Or is it a "forethought" heel, since I'm planning exactly where it will be?)

This blogpost has some interesting details about the construction of afterthought heels, as well as some hints about improving the fit. Since there's no gusset in this kind of sock, it can sometimes be a little too tight over the ankle. I'm going to try the short-row suggestion and see how well it works for my own foot.

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Cascade Heritage sock yarn in "Teal Mix" My first socks of the year are knit from last year's souvenir yarn from Utah, Cascade Heritage Paints in the "Teal Mix" colourway. I used my own pattern, the Cakewalk Socks, which are available for free on Ravelry.

I'm sure I knew what I meant when I wrote the pattern, and lots of people have knit the socks without asking about the stitch counts, but I thought it could use a little bit of clarification (and a new picture) so I rewrote some sections to make them easier to understand, and published the update to Ravelry this morning.

Apparently my tension wasn't exactly the same from one sock to the other, so the spirals came out a little bit differently on each sock - but how cool is it that the heels and toes match almost exactly! I wasn't trying to make that happen; it was just a happy coincidence.

These were a fun pair to knit, and not just because it was my own pattern. A good portion of them were knit on an airplane to and from vacation in Colorado; some of them were knit whilst chatting with friends, and the last section of the foot was knit as winter gave way to spring. That's one of the best parts of souvenir socks - remembering where I bought the yarn, and then knitting memories into every stitch.

A pair of ribbed socks in a variegated teal colourway.

And now, onto the next sock... even though I have other projects that are already started, and I should probably focus on those for a bit as well. But none of them are good traveling projects like this one is going to be! So there.

A ball of rainbow-striped yarn sits above a pair of knitting needles. The end of the yarn is wrapped around the needles in a figure-eight cast-on.

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