Archive for the “plain stockinette” Category

I’ve knit four pair of socks (pics: one | two | three | four) with Patons Kroy before, and I really like that the yarn is slightly thicker than the usual sock yarn I get. It makes thick cushy socks that still don’t feel like they take up too much space in my shoes. As with all the other Kroy socks I’ve made, I started this new pair on US 2 (2.75mm) needles and… it was way too loose. Floppy fabric doesn’t make good socks at all!

The beginning of a toe-up sock.

What? What is going on! A little internet research affirmed my suspicion that the ragg shades really are a little thinner, more like a standard sock yarn. (Hrmph.) So I ripped out the start of the toe that I had, and began again on US 1 (2.25mm) needles, this time with a navy yarn for the toe. That feels like a much better fabric, for sure, and I like the contrasting colour in the toe better too.

A half-knit toe-up sock with a navy toe and rainbow stripes.

The sock starts with a figure eight cast-on with fourteen loops, and I increased on every other round until I had 64 stitches total. It’s now about two inches shorter than my foot, so at this point I’ll put in waste yarn across half the stitches and then go on knitting the leg of the sock. Later, I’ll pull out the waste yarn and pick up those live stitches to knit an afterthought heel. (Or is it a “forethought” heel, since I’m planning exactly where it will be?)

This blogpost has some interesting details about the construction of afterthought heels, as well as some hints about improving the fit. Since there’s no gusset in this kind of sock, it can sometimes be a little too tight over the ankle. I’m going to try the short-row suggestion and see how well it works for my own foot.

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I really wanted to get this pair off the needles before going on vacation, and here it is! Tiger-Striped Socks for Michael, which look exactly like mine except for the white trim at the cuff and the duplicate stitch “claws”.

I’d just started the toe when I noticed a split stitch quite a way down. It didn’t seem like it would be too troublesome to fix, so I got out my tiny crochet hook, dropped the stitch down to the split, caught it properly, and picked all the stitches up again. You can barely tell where the repair was made, and once the socks have been through the wash, any looseness remaining in that column will all work out.

A long column of dropped stitches

All the stitches have been picked up again with this crochet hook.

Then I miscounted on the toe stitches and had to rip back four rounds to start the toe over. Of course.

Figuring out how to duplicate stitch the “toes” was pretty easy, but figuring out the “claws” took me a little longer. Eventually I went for a slightly thicker yarn and embroidered them on, rather than duplicate stitching. Hopefully they aren’t too thick.

Embroidered 'claws' on the white toe of a tiger-striped sock

Now, here’s the weird thing. These are plain stockinette socks. The only purl stitches are in the cuff’s ribbing and in the heel. So what was I thinking here? What even happened?

A red circle shows a mistake of a purl stitch that should be a knit stitch.

Anyway, they’re done and they look really cool. Next up… a new pair for myself!

A pair of tiger-striped socks with white toes and embroidered claws, laid smoothly on a black leather couch

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I started these socks back in January, and worked on them here and there without too much dedication. Although they came with me to many places, I neglected them in favour of other things. But then I had to attend a few long and boring meetings in an auditorium, and no one on the stage could see what I was doing, so I knit and knit and knit… and by late October I’d finished the first sock.

Then, I got a short-notice call that there would be a showing at my house, so I had to clear out for an hour. The yarn came with me, and I’d gotten halfway through the ribbing at the cuff before going home. A weekend of train rides followed, and with nothing else to do but knit, I charged through the leg of the second sock.

Several work-meetings and one long drive up to Vermont later, and I grafted the toe of the second sock just in time to get this project onto the 2015 list!

mindless_stockinette2

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I like to have a simple sock in progress that doesn’t take too much thought and is pretty impossible to mess up. Travel socks are great for knitting on the train or in the car on the way to ski areas, and I always have one with me just in case I get bored and need to kill time. I started this one last month on my way up to Hunter Mountain, and since taking this picture I’ve knit the heel flap and turn so it’ll be ready for my next train ride!

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The yarn is Berroco Sox in the Mackintosh colourway, and I bought it last year when I went to Ottawa for Winterlude. I’m using a standard 64-stitch sock pattern that I’ve mushed together from a few other patterns: it has a 20-round cuff, a 32-row heel flap with a round heel turn that fits me well, and extra stitches picked up at the corner of the gussets to avoid the holes that often form there.

I’m not quite sure what I think of these colours together; do I like them even though they’re ugly, or do I like them because they’re ugly?

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