Tagged: designaknit

Tension swatches of yarn in medium gray, kelly green, and navy blue. 2

In Which the Pirate Starts a Sweater.

It’s (finally) time for a machine-knit fingering weight sweater! I chose three yarns out of my stash – two skeins of gray, one of a bright kelly green, and one navy blue. First, swatching. I tried each of the three yarns on tensions 5 and 6, and decided that T5 felt better, and was less see-through, without being so stiff that it won’t feel...

One pants leg, unseamed, lies at full length on a wooden coffee table. The stripes are an incredibly garish collection of 1970s colours: mustard yellow, brown, steel blue, and some jacquard-looking stripes as well.

In Which the Pirate Attempts to Knit Pants.

Seven years ago, I bought the world’s ugliest yarn (I love it though) intending to knit a pair of EZ’s “Nether Garments”, because what could be cozier than woolen long-johns? Except it never happened, possibly because every time I thought of starting the project, I thought about how long it would take… and put it off again. Then I got a knitting machine, and...

A pair of red socks with blue toes and heels, and a band of skulls and crossbones at the cuff.

In Which the Pirate Finishes the Pirate Socks.

These socks have been an absolute journey. My first attempt was too small, and I didn’t realize it until after I’d knit down past the heel. My second attempt, after recharting the skull and crossbones section to have eight more stitches in it, was upside down – and I still wasn’t happy with my fine gauge colourwork on DPNs. (Uneven. Puckery. Not nice.) I...

The back and two sleeves of a colourblock sweater - cream at the top, light grayish tan in the middle, and darker brown at the bottom.

In Which the Pirate Works on a Sweater.

With Michael’s assistance in wielding the measuring tape, not to mention with the gauge math, I was able to convince Designaknit to provide something resembling a pullover pattern. I don’t really understand a lot of the UI choices in DAK, but I’m trying to ignore that and move on to just making garments. So! I began with a sleeve… And then I knit the...

A scarf in navy blue and white, folded over to show that one side is the reverse colors of the other side. Each section of the colourwork is a different traditional Sanquhar pattern.

In Which the Pirate Seams a Scarf.

It’s finished! I seamed it by hanging it sideways on the knitting machine with the wrong sides together (right-side out), and pulling loops through both sides, then binding off those loops. It’s so squishy, just the right length for me, and I think it’ll be very warm – though I’ll have to wait ’til winter to find out, of course. I need to weigh...

The Sanquhar scarf in progress, showing the front side.

In Which the Pirate Designs for Machine Knitting.

Inspired by Sockmatician’s Sanquhar Scarf, but unwilling to do that much double-knitting with sock yarn, I decided to design something similar to knit on the machine. I began by using Excel as graph paper to fill in squares, which is probably not how its developers ever imagined a spreadsheet application would be used, but it works! Then Michael helped by writing a magic spell...

The Puppies wrap folded over at the bottom so that the front and back sides are visible in the same picture.

In Which the Pirate Knits with the Machine.

I’ve wanted to knit Puppies since I got the knitting machine. Last year I bought four cones of laceweight yarn for it, and promised myself that I wouldn’t buy any more yarn until I’d knit the thing. So… I knit the thing. First, I made a swatch and attempted to felt it (not entirely, just a little bit) in the washing machine. I have...

The end of the scarf, with solid blue lines separating a small snowflake border from the main body snowflake pattern.

In Which the Pirate Makes a Scarf.

Before last week’s vacation, I decided that I wanted to make a new scarf on the machine (since there was no way I was going to get new mittens finished in time) using Loops & Threads “Woolike” yarn from Michaels that I bought as practice yarn for the machine. It’s a light fingering weight, mostly acrylic yarn with a soft feel to it, and...